Standing in the Woods on a Snowy Night

I think I know who this tree belongs to. His house is in the city. He stopped me here. He cannot see his snow-covered forest.

image of woven huts that has been colorized with extreme reds and purples
lightly edited photograph of a sculpture made from dried vines

(for context, see Introducing Haikuku)

I think I know who this tree belongs to.
His house is in the city.
He stopped me here.
He cannot see his snow-covered forest.
my little horse
There is no field nearby
between its forest and cool lake
What a stop on the darkest night of the year
You have to feel like it's great.
He rang a soldier's bell
Ask if there are any mistakes.
What else do you hear?
Just the sound of fresh air and snow.
The forest is beautiful, dense and deep.
But I have a promise to keep.
And I still have miles to go before I can sleep.
And I still have miles to go before I can sleep.

English > Japanese > Scots Gaelic > Romanian > Bambara > German > Sepedi > English

Original:

“Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” by Robert Frost

Whose woods these are I think I know.
His house is in the village though;
He will not see me stopping here
To watch his woods fill up with snow.

My little horse must think it queer
To stop without a farmhouse near
Between the woods and frozen lake
The darkest evening of the year.

He gives his harness bells a shake
To ask if there is some mistake.
The only other sound’s the sweep
Of easy wind and downy flake.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep,
But I have promises to keep,
And miles to go before I sleep,
And miles to go before I sleep.